Tag Archives: lemon

lemon and fresh thyme posset shooter

Once again Jennifer (Delicieux) is hosting this months “Sweet Adventures Blog Hop” and the theme,“lemons.”  I was ready to submit an earlier post on the magical stages of a developing lemon... when I just realized no older posts would be accepted on the blog hop…darn!

A quick re-think and a scan over some ingredients already stocked in the kitchen… lemon posset came to mind.

Lemon posset is a dessert based on a very old British medieval drink called a posset. This drink was made by heating milk, then curdling with an acid such as wine or ale. The hot posset was also used for minor aliments such as the common cold and was often spiced with ginger and aniseed.

Even William Shakespeare’s Macbeth makes reference to this medieval drink when Lady Macbeth uses poisoned possets to knock out the guards outside Duncan’s palace

“The doors are open, and the surfeited grooms

Do mock their charge with snores. I have drugg’d their possets

That death and nature do contend about them,

Whether they live or die.”

Fast forward to the 20th century and posset is a smooth and  luxurious tangy-sweet lemony thickened cream that is chilled and best served in small quantities. A super easy do-ahead dessert for dinner parties. Like Lady Macbeth I hope to knock out (figuratively speaking) my guests bydrugg’d their (my guests) possets with this deliriously lemony dessert shooter with a hint of fresh garden thyme.

Lemon and Fresh Thyme Posset Shooters

Ingredients:

  • 250ml double cream or whipping cream (min fat 35%)
  • 75g granulated sugar
  • 5 sprigs of fresh thyme (optional)
  • zest half of a lemon
  • juice of one lemon
  • thyme leaves to garnish and/or some grated lemon zest

You will need 6 small shot type glasses, the recipe can easily be doubled if you require a larger quantity.

How to make:

Pour the cream into a heavy based saucepan. Add the sugar and fresh thyme. Over a medium heat dissolve the sugar in the cream while stirring continuously. Let the cream come to a gentle boil (do not let the cream boil over), reduce the heat and simmer the cream for three minutes.

Remove the saucepan from the heat, stir in the lemon juice (this will thicken the cream) and lemon zest. Let cool for about 5 minutes, remove the thyme sprigs and pour into 6 small shot glasses. Once cool cover and refrigerate for about 4 hours (will thicken further) or overnight.

Before serving (straight from the fridge) scatter over a few thyme leaves and/or grated lemon zest.

Note: Do not use cream that has a lower fat content than 35% or the cream will curdle when you add the lemon juice. Ideally double cream which has a much higher fat content should be used which will result in a creamier and thicker setting posset.

Using a microplane zester (my star zester) will give the best results for obtaining a very fine grating of lemon zest.

This post is part of the “Sweet Adventures Blog Hop,” click (here) and check out all the other lemon dessert entries!

the lemon tree

Gardening in Bahrain definitely poses some great challenges and if you are “no expert” like me, then gardening can become quite exhausting at times! However, I do try my hand at keeping a few edibles in the garden such as herbs, lemons, limes (still waiting), dates, lemongrass and some baby tomatoes.

What I absolutely love about gardening and especially this time of year, is witnessing the first stages of growth… then watching that new beginning transform into an edible culinary ingredient that has endless possibilities both in cooking and baking!

Two years ago I planted a lemon tree (which was quite big to begin with) into a very large pot and was very excited at the prospect of growing my own organic lemons! Sigh… last year I ended up with about five lemons! It was quite a painful sight, seeing lots of new buds (potential lemons) fall to the ground and realize that my efforts of successfully growing lemons was not to be! So now you know that this post is not going to be about  how to grow lemons…  but a glimpse into the new beginnings within the garden that sometimes we fail to notice as our busy lives consume our every waking hour. This year I am feeling more hopeful with each new stage of growth on my lemon tree! So take a moment, marvel and appreciate the life of a lemon…

 Buds

The amount of buds growing on the lemon tree will determine the volume of fruit it produces… if of course they don’t fall… like mine did last year! Apparently you need to underwater at this stage.

Flowers

The buds of the lemon tree blossom and the flowers exude an intoxicating soft lemony perfume that fills the surrounding air…and what an amazing scent it is!

 Ripening Fruit

The flower is in bloom and peeking out from its center is the developing lemon!

Lemons need plenty of water at this stage of growth so the fruit becomes full and juicy.
This was one of last years lemons which seemed to take so long to ripen… !
 
My quest to successfully grow lemons will continue!  In the mean time, if anyone out there in cyber space is an expert on the subject of citrus trees I would love your advice!

You might like to try some recipes using lemons. Click on image for recipes!

crostini with lemon ricotta, fresh basil, black pepper and drizzled with a vanilla infused olive oil

Crostini means “little toasts” in Italian… so topping my “little toasts” with a creamy lemon ricotta cheese, adding a few twists of black pepper, some basil and adding a little sweetness with a drizzle of vanilla infused olive oil gives these “little toasts” a bit of panache.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup of home-made ricotta cheese (click for recipe)
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled and crushed (optional)
  • finely grated zest of 1 lemon
  • sea salt
  • 1  stick of french bread cut into slices (1cm thick)
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and sliced in half (optional)
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • a handful of fresh basil leaves, finely sliced
  • vanilla infused olive oil or plain olive oil
How to make:

Combine the ricotta cheese, garlic and lemon zest in a small bowl, season with sea salt to taste. This can be prepared some hours in advance and stored in the refrigerator until needed.

Preheat the grill to high and lightly toast french bread slices on both sides until golden brown. Rub the cut side of garlic over one side of each piece of toasted bread. When cooled spread the prepared ricotta cheese on top of each piece of crostini. Season with a few twists of black pepper, drizzle over some vanilla olive oil and scatter over fresh basil on top and serve.

Try using fresh mint instead of basil and drizzle some walnut oil over the crostini instead of  vanilla oil for a different variation.
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